Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Care about business strategy? - Tune to this channel...

If you think the principles and values of agile extend beyond the narrow boundaries of software development teams to organisations and corporate cultures, I think, like me, you'll be inspired by a couple of presentations from the recent Agile On The Beach conference, They are great bedtime viewing (for when you've finally had enough of Bakeoff!).

Firstly a video from Tom Sedge: TDD for Business Strategies – Developing Business Strategies Test-First.
Tom Sedge provides very practical advice on how to define mission (why we're here - our purpose and driving cause), vision (where we're heading - how the world will be different), goals (what we want - destinations or desired outcomes), and strategies (how we will get there - potential routes to the destination). His examples of good (Tesla, SpaceX) and bad (Kodak) missions/visions are particularly helpful. How could the inventor of the digital camera go bust, just as digital photography exploded on scene, particularly as their founder George Eastman expressed his vision in the 1880's as "a world where the camera is as convenient as the pencil". These days I quite often wish I had a pencil on me, yet I always have a camera! His vision makes a sad contrast with Kodak's mission and vision statement from the early 2000's - a paragraph of unmemorable platitudes about customer focus and shareholder value, that no one outside the company would care a fig about!


The second one is from Bjarte Bogsnes, Vice President of Performance Management Development at the major international oil company, Statoil. It's on Beyond Budgeting – an agile management model for new business and people realities. If you give it a listen you'll understand why (even though I think budgets are essential) I'm not that keen on investing much time in annual budgeting. In his words, the approach "... is about rethinking how we manage organisations in a post-industrial world, where innovative management models represent the only sustainable competitive advantage ... releasing people from the burdens of stifling bureaucracy and suffocating control systems, trusting them with information and giving them time to think, reflect, share, learn and improve."

Remember he's talking about a massive oil company - not the easiest place to introduce agile thinking! Gives hope to the rest of us.

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